Vaccination and autism – is there a connection?

Is vaccination safe? Chances are you asking that question if you’re a parent. The fear of side effects and the possibility of causing autism is not something you should take lightly.

In the last decade there has been a strong anti vaccination movement. On top of that we are being bombarded from the media and celebrities about the dangers and risk that come with vaccination.

So are these concerns real of is it just fear mongering and pushing a certain agenda? Let’s dive in and do our research together.

Vaccination linked to autism – the begining

So how did it come to be, that certain people believe the before mentioned hypothesis?

In 1998 Andrew Wakefield published a study in the medical journal The Lancet. His premise was that vaccinating your child can cause autism. This has sadly snowballed into a massive mainstream movement in the space of a couple of years.

The result is that measles outbreaks have erupted in Europe, Australia and the US. Some communities refuse or fear vaccines. And this is just for measles. Countless deaths have come due to this man.

 In California alone, nearly 8,500 cases of pertussis were reported in 2010 – with 10 infant deaths resulting. The last time whooping cough was this extensive a problem was 1947.

Refusing vaccine has become such a problem, that some countries are making vaccines mandatory for children. In 2019 WHO called vaccine hesitancy on of the biggest threats to global health.

What was wrong with his study?

Where to begin? His study involved only 12 children. As small as this sample size is, that wouldn’t been a major problem if his data could be replicated. More than dozen of studies couldn’t replicate his findings.

And how could they? It was proven he lied, falsified data and had a conflict of interest. Even he himself, couldn’t replicate the findings of his study.

The study was retracted in 2010 and he was disbarred but sadly, the damage he caused was already done.

What do vaccinations contain?

  • Formaldehyde

It is used for decades in vaccines to inactivate viruses and detoxify bacteria and with this sickness if prevented when injected.

On top of that formaldehyde is ever present in human body as a part of our natural metabolic process. The amount contained in vaccines is negligible.

  • Aluminium

Is added as an adjuvant to boost the immune response. More antibodies are produced and they last longer, which reduces the doses needed to get the desired effect.

Thirosamol

Methylmercury is a form of mercury found in fish and can become toxic in high doses as it can build up in the human body.

Thirosamol contains ethylmercury which is processed by the body faster. Due to this fact and it being a low dose it doesn’t present any risk long term.

Thirosamol has also been taken out of childhood vaccines in 2001. The only vaccines that contain it are influenza ones, and even they are available in versions without it.

  • Antibiotics

They are used in some vaccines to prevent bacterial contamination while being made.

  • Gelatin

Gelatin is used as a preservative and stabilizer. It role is keeping vaccines effective under heat or cold for the duration of their shelf life.

  • MSG

Like gelatin it is also a preservative and stabilizer. FDA, WHO and the UN all declare MSG to be safe to use. After all it has been in use for decades in food as a flavour-enhancer.

It is also only present only in two vaccines. Namely adenovirus and influenza.

Herd immunity

vaccination

Herd immunity or also the herd effect is a form of indirect protection. This occurs when a large percentage of population becomes immune to an infection. They are providing a measure of protection for individuals who are not immune.

This are usually groups who can’t get vaccinated, like the elderly and the sick.

Once we reach a certain threshold, herd immunity slowly eliminates a disease from a community. If we achieve this worldwide, this can result in the permanent reduction of infections to zero. This is called eradication.

To date, two diseases have been eradicated using herd immunity and vaccination. Rinderpest and smallpox.

Herd immunity applies to contagious diseases. The ones that can be transmitted from one person to another. Tetanus for example, is infectious but not contagious. In this case herd immunity does not apply.

My opinion on vaccination

As a father of two I couldn’t bear to cause damage or hurt my children. I wish all the best for them, and want to do what is right. That’s why both of my children are vaccinated, just like me, and their mother.

Be smart, don’t play with the health of your children. It is something you may regret your whole life.

REFERENCE

Author: Ivan Vlahinić

I am not a scientist. But i don’t have to be a scientist to be able to deftly use the scientific method in your daily life. In fact, you can be one helluva ‘thinker’ (in the scientific sense) and not be a scientist. For instance, nutritionists and personal trainers like me, who use and embrace science and the scientific method are better trainers because of it. Why? Because rather than just being a parrot and telling my clients what to do, because that’s what I have been told when I was younger I understand the "why" of my advice. And if I dont? Then I fully admit that i don't, and that's fine. The more you learn in the field of fitness and nutrition, the more you realize there is a lot of stuff that you dont know. But this is something that is true of all fields of work or life. The scientific method is the single most powerful way of thinking, that's why I embrace it. Anecdotes are nice, but data and facts trumps anecdotes.

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